Monday, March 25, 2013

Titan Marine RUM-V Vehicle Prototypes

Here they are, in all their glory:  The prototypes from the Titan Marine vehicles.

These are the first wave of the RUM-V vehicles, and I can't say how truly happy I am with how everything fits up.

Digital is one thing.  Having it in your hands is another.  I guess that's why this whole wacky 3d-printing thing is catching on with all the cool kids, eh?

Anyway, here's the remainder of the pics of the printed prototypes.  It's a monster of an update, so if you have dial-up internet access, you're probably going to want to take a jog or something and come back later when the pics load.

Note that the rough "nubs" that look like rivets are the remainders of the trellis-like support structures formed via the printing process.  They clean off easily (thank God) with a hobby knife and some sandpaper.

 


 The tread units from the Earth Force APC are going to be the integral component to track-based RUM-V vehicles.  They fit up nicely in the corner formed by the hull and the basic frame.

 The hover platform, in the center of the pic above, is smooth as glass.  Rebel Mike and I are thinking it will make a good foundation for some new sleek and swoopy alien vehicles.






Sorry for some of the "yellow" shots.  Twisty florescent bulbs are the devil.
 
 Rebel Minis Earth Force APC hull shown for reference.  Some parts will be compatible with the old hull, if you have one.  Some won't.







 Note fingerprints and chewed fingernails, but no discernable print lines.  Beautiful.


 
Here's a series of shots showing the support structure nubs.  They came off easily, without a hitch.


But they sure look ugly, no?  Not to worry.  You won't even know they were there on the final product.


The antigrav module is one of my favorite bits.  The detailing turned out wonderfully. 








 The turret ring of the Titan Marine Light Tank was a polar array of small, stretched-out spheroids tucked into the circular seam of the pocket created when I sunk the hatch down into the hull.

The affect looks great on the final model.


The small 45 degree line is the single visible flaw I saw among the parts.  Fortunately, it's tucked up and inside, away from view.  I wanted to fill it, but didn't want to smear putty and create a further blemish that also obscured detail.  If you view the full size pic, you'll see it's about as wide as my thumbprint lines.  No biggie.

Printing was done by Paul at Visionproto.com

As you can see, he puts out beautiful work.  Send him a request for a quote, and tell him I said, "hi."

Best,
JBR
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